test

April 22, 2009

Testing to see whether Maemo WordPy client works with WordPress from a Nokia N800…
updated version 4/28

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personal blog on WordPress

April 5, 2009

I signed up for a blog at WordPress, though there’s nothing there as yet. From time to time I’ve thought of getting a personal blog. There are few restrictions on what I can write here, beyond the basic guidance to use good judgment. But I believe that since it’s hosted on sun.com it reflects somewhat on the company, and also that readers here are more likely to be interested in information somehow related to computers. So some topics seem out of place here to me, though different bloggers make different judgments on what they will write about.

It was hard to choose between WordPress and Blogspot and both looked like they would do the job. More serious blog sites and hosted software would be overkill for my casual and intermittent writing. The main drawback of WordPress.com I read about was that it’s difficult to customize the blog beyond the basic templates. No problem for me since I’m not overly concerned with the look and feel, other than an extreme dislike of uber-chic sites which use dark grey 7 point font on mottled black backgrounds.



Hello world!

April 3, 2009

Welcome to WordPress.com. This is your first post. Edit or delete it and start blogging!


R&D Spending – IEEE report

April 3, 2009

In my second blog posting I wrote about IEEE Spectrum’s survey of 2004 R&D spending. Today I looked at their latest report, for 2007, to see what happened to those top companies in the intervening years. Ford slipped from #1 to #8 despite holding R&D at 4.3% of sales, meanwhile Toyota climbed from #3 to #1 even while their spending dropped from 4.1% to 3.6% of sales. Size matters. GM clearly takes R&D seriously, climbing from #5 to #2 by increasing R&D spending from 3.4% to 4.5% of sales – an increase of $1.6 billion. Maybe if they survive, they really will bring the Volt to market and recapture lost market share in the new energy economy.

In the computer world, Microsoft is on top at #9 overall, with R&D spending increasing a bit more slowly than sales, but spending an impressive $93k per employee. Sun slipped slightly in rank and in spending as percent of sales, on a modest increase in R&D dollars. IBM increased R&D both in absolute dollars and in percent of sales, but slipped in rank. With their size comes a big R&D budget. AMD is a real standout, doubling R&D spending, moving up from #89 to #65, and increasing spending as percent of sales from 18.7% to 30.0%. AMD’s R&D per employee at $112k exceeds even that of the pharamaceutical companies which traditionally lead in this measure.

In the table below I colored the 2007 "Rank" column red if the company declined both in rank and in R&D spending as percent of sales. I colored it green if the company increased both in rank and in R&D spending as percent of sales. In the 2007 "$k/ employee" column I colored it red if the spending was below the median of IEEE’s top 100 companies, and green if it was above the 80% percentile.



2004

2007

Company Rank R&D ($B) % of Sales Rank R&D ($B) % of Sales $k/ employee
Ford 1 7.4 4.3% 8 7.5 4.3% 30
Daimler (Chrysler) 2 7.2 4.0% 22 4.7 3.2% 17
Toyota 3 7.1 4.1% 1 8.8 3.6% 28
Pfizer 4 6.6 12.6% 3 8.1 16.8% 93
GM 5 6.5 3.4% 2 8.1 4.5% 30
Siemens 6 6.4 6.7% 19 5.1 4.7% 13
Microsoft 7 6.2 15.5% 9 7.1 13.9% 90
Matsushita 8 5.7 7.1% 18 5.1 6.1% 17
Glaxo Smith Kline 9 5.3 13.9% 12 6.3 13.9% 61
Johnson & Johnson 10 5.2 11.0% 6 7.7 12.6% 64
IBM 11 5.2 5.4% 15 5.8 5.9% 15
Intel 13 4.8 14.0% 14 5.8 15.1% 67
HP 25 3.5 4.4% 35 3.6 3.5% 21
Fujitsu 46 2.2 5.0% 54 2.4 5.0% 14
TI 51 2 15.7% 58 2.2 15.9% 71
Sun 56 1.8 16.1% 62 2 14.4% 59
AMD 89 0.9 18.7% 65 1.8 30.0% 112